Manali - The Valley Of Gods

Manali - The Valley Of Gods

Manali

Manali is full of places to eat, see, and stay. Why is it one of the best tourist attractions in India? Well, first of all, you can ski, soak in hot springs, and visit one of the largest wildlife sanctuaries in India. Few cities offer so many services at the same time.

Manali is a resort town in the mountains of Himachal Pradesh, India, located at the northern end of the Kuru Valley and formed by the Beas River. The city is located in the Kulu district, approximately 270 kilometers (170 miles) north of the Shimla state capital, and approximately 544 kilometers (338 miles) northeast of the capital, Delhi. With a population of 8,096 recorded in the 2011 Indian census, Manali was the starting point of an ancient trade route that crossed the territory of the Federal Republic of Ladakh, the Karakoram Pass, and reached Shache and Hotan in the basin of the Tarim from China. Manali is a popular tourist destination in India and is the gateway to the Lahar and Spiti districts and the city of Ladakh.

Climate Manali has a subtropical plateau climate (Cfb), with hot summers and relatively cold winters with a large temperature difference between day and night. Temperatures range from -7 ° C (19 ° F) to 30 ° C (86 ° F) throughout the year, with the hottest day above 30 ° C (86 ° F) and the coldest day above below -7 ° C (19 Fahrenheit). The average temperature in summer is between 10°C (50°F) and 30°C (86°F), and in winter it ranges from -7°C (19°F) to 15°C (59°F). The precipitation in ranges from 31 mm (1.2 inches) in November to 217 mm (8.5 inches) in July. On average, rainfall in winter and spring is about 45 mm (1.8 inches), and as the monsoon approaches, summer increases to about 115 mm (4.5 inches). The average annual total precipitation is 1,363 mm (53.7 inches). Manali mainly experiences snowfall between December and early March.